Archives For March 15, 2018

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Reich: I think so. I know there are extremists who are interested in genealogy and genetics. But I think those are very marginal people, and there’s, of course, a concern they may impinge on the mainstream.

But if you actually take any serious look at this data, it just confounds every stereotype. It’s revealing that the differences among populations we see today are actually only a few thousand years old at most and that everybody is mixed. I think that if you pay any attention to this world, and have any degree of seriousness, then you can’t come out feeling affirmed in the racist view of the world. You have to be more open to immigration. You have to be more open to the mixing of different peoples. That’s your own history.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/03/ancient-dna-history/554798/?utm_source=twb

 

Newer findings complicate the story, however. In a study published last June in the Journal of Human Genetics, researchers sequenced the mitochondrial DNA of 12 Yamnaya individuals, along with their immediate predecessors and descendants. The remains were found in burial mounds, or kurgans (from which the theory takes its name), in modern-day Ukraine. They had been buried in layers atop one another from the end of the Stone Age through the Bronze Age, between about 4500 and 1500 B.C.—the same time as the genetic replacement event in Europe. The earliest and midrange specimens’ mitochondrial DNA (which is inherited from the mother) was almost entirely local. But the mitochondrial DNA of the most recent specimens included DNA from central Europe, including present-day Poland, Germany and Sweden. This discovery indicates that “there were pendulum migrations back and forth,” says lead author Alexey Nikitin

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/new-evidence-fuels-debate-over-the-origin-of-modern-languages/

Several resources are available for those looking to learn or practice their Louisiana French:

– Classes organized by the department of French at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge
– Classes for adults run by poet Kirby Jambon, from June 13 through August 8 at the University of Louisiana in Lafayette
– The LearnCajun app, available for free on the App Store
– Vocabulary flashcards developed by Louisiana author C. Marshall Turner, available for free on his website
– Discussion groups and tables françaises on Facebook

 

Plusieurs ressources sont disponibles pour s’initier au français louisianais ou se perfectionner :

– Les cours du département de français de l’Université d’Etat de la Louisiane à Baton Rouge
– Les cours pour adultes du poète Kirby Jambon, du 13 juin au 8 août 2018 à l’Université de la Louisiane à Lafayette
– L’application LearnCajun, disponible gratuitement sur l’App Store
– Les fiches de vocabulaire de l’écrivain louisianais C. Marshall Turner, disponibles gratuitement sur son site web
– Les groupes de discussion et « tables françaises » sur Facebook

https://france-amerique.com/the-rebirth-of-cajun-french-in-louisiana-in-classrooms-and-online/?ct=t(FA_Hebdo_du_5_octobre_2017