Archives For politics

This survey is just the latest exhibit in a mounting case that suggests students have been presented with a warped view of the tradeoffs associated with unfettered free expression. Inclusivity is not in conflict with free speech. Whoever taught these students that these two phenomena were contradictory did them and the nation a terrible disservice.


Around the same time, a New York University psychologist, Jonathan Haidt, was formulating a theory about why liberals and conservatives have such a hard time productively conversing.

After mucking around in a lot of survey data, he came up with this basic idea: Liberals and people of the left underpin their politics with moral concerns about harm and fairness; they are driven by the imperative to help the vulnerable and see justice done. Conservatives and people of the right value these things as well but have several additional moral touchstones — loyalty, respect and sanctity. They value in-group solidarity, deference to authority, and the protection of purity in mind and body. To liberals, those sincerely held values can look a lot like, in Dr. Haidt’s words, “xenophobia, authoritarianism and Puritanism.” This asymmetry is the fountainhead of mutual incomprehension and disdain.


What if the scourge of false news on the internet is not the result of Russian operatives or partisan zealots or computer-controlled bots? What if the main problem is us?

People are the principal culprits, according to a new study examining the flow of stories on Twitter. And people, the study’s authors also say, prefer false news.

As a result, false news travels faster, farther and deeper through the social network than true news.


Polling by the Pew Research Center last year came to similar conclusions: 50 percent of millennials, between the ages of 18 and 36, said gun laws in the U.S. should be more strict. That share was almost identical among the general public, according to Kim Parker, director of social trends research at Pew.

Pew did find significant differences between millennials and older generations on two gun control proposals — banning assault-style weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 rounds. The results showed that a greater share of millennials — both Republicans and Democrats — are more conservative when it comes to those bans compared with Generation Xers, baby boomers and members of the silent generation.


What Goes Into the Overall Score?

  • Health Care 16%

    The highest-weighted ranking looks at health care access and affordability, health care quality and health outcomes for citizens.

    See Health Care Rankings »

  • Education 16%

    The education ranking measures how well states educate students in preschool, K-12 and different levels of higher education.

    See Education Rankings »

  • Economy 14%

    The economy ranking tracks unemployment rates, GDP growth, migration into the state, patents, new businesses and more.

    See Economy Rankings »

  • Opportunity 13%

    This ranking measures poverty, housing affordability and equality for women, minorities and people with disabilities.

    See Opportunity Rankings »

  • Infrastructure 12%

    The infrastructure rankings gauge the quality of states’ bridges, public transportation, power grids, broadband and more.

    See Infrastructure Rankings »

  • Crime & Corrections 11%

    Crime & Corrections ranks states based on public safety and the quality and fairness of their prison systems, including racial bias.

    See Crime & Corrections Rankings »

  • Fiscal Stability 10%

    This ranking tracks states’ government credit ratings, liquidity, pension fund liability and budget balancing.

    See Fiscal Stability Rankings »

  • Quality of Life 8%

    This new ranking tracks states’ air quality, pollution, voter participation, social support and more.

    See Quality of Life Rankings »

Weights may not add to 100 because of rounding.


In short, the public debate about how Congress ought to respond to this latest mass shooting is guided by two broad principles. Dubious on their own, they are even more witless when combined. The first is the idea that the most important thing is to “do something.” The second is that we ought to look to high-schoolers for the answer.


A Study of Active Shooter Incidents in the United States Between 2000 and 2013


For this advocacy — and that’s what it is — Hogg has been feted as a key leader within a “mass movement” that is determined to reform America; he has been praised for his attempt to “force change”; he has been cast, including by himself, as a lion who refuses to back down; and, in some of the more cunning quarters of the left, he has been turned into a walking demonstration of the need to lower the voting age. At no point has anyone hosting him suggested that his relevance is limited to his capacity to describe his experience; rather, he has in every instance been asked to join a public political fight — a fight, remember, that relates to nothing less foundational than the American Bill of Rights.

The deadly school shooting this month in Parkland, Florida, has ignited national outrage and calls for action on gun reform. But while certain policies may help decrease gun violence in general, it’s unlikely that any of them will prevent mass school shootings, according to James Alan Fox, the Lipman Family Professor of Criminology, Law, and Public Policy at Northeastern.


Don’t Discount Reunification

February 27, 2018 — 1 Comment

Future Economics

Conventional analysis of Korea seems to be incorrect in its view of the probability of North-South reunification. The conventional view is that reunification grows more unlikely as the disparity in wealth between the North and South (now far greater than that between West and East Germany in the 1980s) continues to increase, and as young South Koreans, who tend to be more opposed to reunifying with the North, come of age.

While we have no way of knowing what the odds of reunification are, we should recognize that the logic behind these conventional views is not sound. Most South Koreans are Baby Boomers or senior citizens, so the issue of young Koreans tending to oppose the idea of reunification may not be nearly as relevant as one might think. An estimated 58 percent of South Koreans in general favour reunification.

As for the enormous economic disparity between the North and…

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