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It’s the most rapid descent for a French president in recent memory. A new poll published by YouGov last week found Macron has a remarkably weak 36 percent approval rating — a massive slide for a man who won the presidency with 65 percent of the vote despite never having held elected office.

https://www.vox.com/world/2017/8/14/16114640/emmanuel-macron-unpopular

 

https://pauluslandericus.com/2017/05/07/macron-wins-e-u-survives-for-now/

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That didn’t go far enough for fellow Democrats who called on her to rebuke the demonstration.

“It’s very disappointing and uncalled for. If Rep. Abrams does not rebuke what happened, she will lose a lot of support,” said state Rep. Scott Holcomb, who is neutral in the race. “This isn’t how Democrats want this primary race to be conducted.”

Evans joins the ranks of other Democrats who have been booed or heckled at Netroots events:  Nancy Pelosi was booed and heckled in 2013, Black Lives Matter protesters interrupted Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley’s speech in 2015.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Netroots of the democratic party: bigoted, intolerant, impolite, immature, ugly, thuggish, incoherent.

If this is what being a democrat looks like, Georgians will say “thanks but no thanks.”

Stacey Evans gets shouted down at Netroots conference

The alt right and social justice warriors are racial collectivists who are opposed to the basic values of the Enlightenment.

Antifa believes it is pursuing the opposite of authoritarianism. Many of its activists oppose the very notion of a centralized state. But in the name of protecting the vulnerable, antifascists have granted themselves the authority to decide which Americans may publicly assemble and which may not. That authority rests on no democratic foundation. Unlike the politicians they revile, the men and women of antifa cannot be voted out of office. Generally, they don’t even disclose their names.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/the-rise-of-the-violent-left/534192/?utm_source=twb

Laws permitting generalised surveillance, as well as a proposal for a new espionage act that could criminalise journalists and whistleblowers as spies, were cited by Reporters Without Borders as it knocked the UK down two places from last year, to 40th out of 180 countries in its World Press Freedom Index.

In the past five years, the UK has slipped 12 places down the index. Rebecca Vincent, RSF’s UK bureau director, said this year’s ranking would have been worse were it not for a general decline in press freedom around the world, making journalists in Britain comparatively better off than those in countries such as Turkey and Syria.

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/apr/26/uk-world-press-freedom-index-reporters-without-borders?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

But this year, far from the headlines, Germany and two of its European allies, the Czech Republic and Romania, quietly took a radical step down a path toward something that looks like an EU army while avoiding the messy politics associated with it: They announced the integration of their armed forces.

 

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has repeatedly floated the idea of an EU army, only to be met with either ridicule or awkward silence. That remains the case even as the U.K., a perennial foe of the idea, is on its way out of the union. There’s little agreement among remaining member states over what exactly such a force would look like and which capabilities national armed forces would give up as a result. And so progress has been slow going.

Germany Is Quietly Building a European Army Under Its Command