Archives For literary mind

It is a growing trend that new equates to good and old to bad in today’s society. I witness this attitude a lot in historical discussions where people carry the notion that present and future attitudes on culture and society are simply better due to their newness. Don’t give up the classics due to their age.

https://aleteia.org/blogs/catholic-thinking/on-the-tiresome-notion-of-progress/

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Follow up on the previous essay on constructing a library in the home. This one delves into the thought processes for library organization. His personal library would be sorted by conservative politics, Catholicism, and culture. If and when I construct my own I predict it will be sorted in a similar fashion between historical, literature, and religious books. How would you organize your library?

https://aleteia.org/blogs/catholic-thinking/how-to-organize-your-library/

Pretty crafty idea to construct a library in your own home. I too as a young boy set as a goal that once I own my home that a library be inside. Libraries are far much more than a shelf of books and I think the author does a good job of explaining why. I would imagine my library shelves to contain countless volumes of Roman and Medieval history. While e-books are certainly a useful innovation and allow me to carry what accounts to a full library on the go I fear it will never come close to replacing the ambiance of a quiet room in which knowledge lives.

https://aleteia.org/blogs/catholic-thinking/why-you-should-build-a-library/

What is a Myth?

November 22, 2013 — Leave a comment
  1. It is extra-literary. 
  2. The pleasure of myth depends hardly at all on such usual narrative attractions as suspense and surprise.
  3. Human sympathy is at a minimum. We do not project ourselves strongly into the characters. We feel indeed that the pattern of their movements has a profound relevance to our own life, but we do not imaginatively transport ourselves into theirs.
  4. Myth is always in one sense of the word “fantastic.” It deals with the impossibles and preternaturals.  
  5. The experience may be sad or joyful but it is always grave. Comic myth is impossible.
  6. The experience is not only grave but awe-inspiring. Its as if something of great moment had been communicated to us. 

Been trudging along in Master and Commander for a while and decided to take small break to learn all these nautical terms. Hopefully I can then comprehend what exactly is going on but otherwise an excellent read. 

Other books I am reading simultaneously: 

An Experiment in Criticism – C.S. Lewis

Mere Christianity – C.S. Lewis

Fellowship of the Ring – J.R.R. Tolkien

Tao Te Ching – Lao Tzu 

A History of Korea – Michael Seth

I would like to finish half of them plus Soccernomics by November.