Archives For modern society

For many decades, critics of economic development argued that rising incomes and greater material abundance did not lead to higher levels of happiness. In 1974, Richard Easterlin from the University of Southern California noted that people in richer countries were not happier than people in poor countries. Subsequent research found that the so-called Easterlin Paradox did not exist. Instead, happiness seems to increase with affluence. Today, a different kind of criticism is gaining round. Happiness may be increasing, the critics of economic development concede, but life in a modern capitalist society is more and more devoid of meaning. What are we to make of this criticism?

https://humanprogress.org/article.php?p=1223

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A similar thing could be said about the Church of England. Britain is one of the most Godless countries on earth and yet Anglican and Catholic schools are still very popular because people like the ethos, and parents are prepared to take their kids to church every Sunday to get in. Many find it a rewarding experience, after initial reluctance, but then there is a fair amount of evidence that regular churchgoing increases health and happiness.

Ersatz religion has many of the benefits of the real thing, and the same can be said for ersatz village life. Ever since the Industrial Revolution there has been a romantic longing to return to the countryside, which in the 19th century was largely the idea of High Tories who glossed over the horror of rural life. Yet for the all advantages of city living – sweatshops are generally far better paid than backbreaking agricultural work – there is evidence that urban living has a bad effect on our mental health, with city dwellers 40 per cent more likely to suffer from psychiatric problems.(  (Although the mentally ill are also more likely to move to cities.)

https://capx.co/open-societies-need-to-rediscover-heroic-ideals/

If tattoos were once an act of rebellion against cultural norms, now they are a well-established norm. If you want a tattoo, hey, it’s a free country. But it seems many people still get them laboring under the delusion that they’re a hallmark of individualism. The desire to use visual signals on your skin to proclaim yourself unique to people you don’t even know can’t be terribly healthy. It is, in a subtle and penetrating way, kind of selfish. Or maybe my misanthropy is showing, but the omnipresence of people begging to be noticed for such superficial reasons is surely annoying.

http://thefederalist.com/2017/08/04/need-admit-america-tattoo-problem/

The University of Hampshire found that youngsters who were studied on issues of entitlement scored 25 percent higher than people aged 40 to 60 and 50 per cent higher than those over that age bracket.

 

In order to break from this mentality experts believe that an individuals should learn to become more humble, more grateful and accept their limitations.

Psychology Today also offers some other alternatives to solving the problem.

These including retrospectively reflecting on annoying incidents from someone else’s perspective, promote others achievements and stop justifying things to yourself that are wrong.

https://www.indy100.com/article/young-people-entitlement-disappointed-narcissism-psychology-research-7867961

I suspect the whole ‘Trans’ issue has been cooked up so that nobody can ever say anything about it (including here) without being somehow in the wrong, and open to attack by the Thought Police. Now that there’s no more mileage in homosexuality, it’s the best way of making conservatives look like bigots.

http://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2017/07/your-neighbours-shiny-new-suv-is-about-to-crash-the-economy.html

It is a growing trend that new equates to good and old to bad in today’s society. I witness this attitude a lot in historical discussions where people carry the notion that present and future attitudes on culture and society are simply better due to their newness. Don’t give up the classics due to their age.

https://aleteia.org/blogs/catholic-thinking/on-the-tiresome-notion-of-progress/

Pretty interesting study for the most part. There are a multitude of factors that are coming into play but the idea that basic survival knowledge and being able to handle basic tasks are declining is disappointing. I find it incredible that only 37% feel confident when dealing with a flat tire. While I agree with the conclusion that modern living can often leave no time for dealing with these sorts of tasks, a basic knowledge can prove to be invaluable. Not only can it give you confidence and a sense of accomplishment but it can also save valuable time and money. I guess I can count my blessings that the upbringing by my parents allowed for opportunities to learn these sorts of DIY skills.

https://www.studyfinds.org/change-lightbulb-household-chores-study/